Free Term Paper on William Blake - Tyger Tyger

Home       Free Paper Index     
 

image of Tyger Tyger by William Blake

Enter Your Term Paper Topic Below:

Search For Your Essay At MONSTER ESSAYS!

  1. Essay Galaxy Archive, 45,000 + essays and term papers (highest quality)
  2. Monster Essay Archive, 40,000+ essays and term papers  
  3. Essay Archive, 35,000+ essays and term papers
  4. Free Term Papers and Book Reports Index  (Over 2500 good papers)

Free Essay the Poems of William Blake



Many poems written by the same author often have similar themes. The authors usually believe in something very strongly and their poems usually reflect such a nature. Sometimes poets reflect aspects of their personal life in their poems. In the poems "The Lamb" and "The Tiger", by William Blake, the poet discusses similar themes in both.
In the poem "The Lamb", I interpret that William Blake discusses many points questioning creation and religion. He describes the lamb as being an object of innocence and fragility when he says "Gave thee clothing of delight, Softest clothing, woolly, bright; Gave thee such a tender voice" (line 5). "Blake develops an elaborate personal mythology that underlies virtually all symbolism and ideas in his work." (Shilstone, p.223) Blake discusses that the creator of the lamb is also calls Himself a Lamb. With this he brings religious significance into the poem. It the New Testament, Jesus of Nazareth is referred as God's Lamb.
There are a few themes developed in "The Lamb." Blake describes the lamb as symbol of childhood innocence. He also questions about how the lamb was brought into existence, which mentions another theme of divine intervention and how all creatures were created. The poem is nothing but one wondering question to another (Harmon, p. 361).
"The Tiger" by William Blake describes the tiger as being an symbol of evil. This is displayed when Blake says "What an anvil? what dread grasp, Dare its deadly terrors clasp?" By repeating variations of the word "dread" in the poem, he emphasizes the evil of tiger and the evil this tiger possesses. The mighty beast is whole world of experience outside ourselves, a world of igneous creation and destruction, faced with a terrifying beauty (Harmon, p.360). This poem also contains the theme of creation in that it also mentions the Lamb. The narrator questions, "Did he who make the Lamb make thee?" (line 20)
Both poems contain many similarities according to their themes. "The Tiger" was taken from a collection of poems by Blake called The Songs of Experience. These poems focus on evil and the importance of understanding the evil around in hope of attaining a state of innocence. "In The Songs of Innocence Blake suggests that by recapturing the imagination and wonderment of childhood, we could achieve the goal of self-awareness... the poems thus present views of the world as filtered through the eyes and mind of a child." (Literature, The English Tradition, p. 606) Thou can also infer that evil can bring forth the loss of innocence. Therefore, one existing similarity is that they both concern the loss of innocence. Many poems from each set are companion pieces to each other. "The Lamb" is an emblem of innocence, corresponding to "The Tiger" as the emblem of experience. (Harmon, p. 365)
Another shared theme between the two works, "The Tiger" and "The Lamb", is the theme of creation and divine intervention. In both poems Blake questions multiple times about how each was created. In "The Lamb", Blake suggests that the lamb was created by a godlike being. In "The Tiger" Blake questions if the tiger was created by the same being that created the lamb. Such curiosity is a common theme to both poems.
Thus, through the information discussed, it can be seen that there exists a common comparison in two separate works by William Blake. The themes of both poems are in conjunction with each other. Therefore, according to theme it can be proven that there exists significant similarities in these works by William Blake.
Works Cited

1. William Harmon, Top 500 Poems (Mew York: Columbia University Press, 1992)

2. Frederick W. Shilstone, British Poetry (Middletown, NY: N&N Publishing Company, 1988)

3. Literature; The English Tradition, Prentic Hall, New Jersey, 1991.
--------------------------------------------------------------


1. Poem Analysis The Chimmney Swe
?The Chimney Sweeper? By William Blake Unlike the one in Songs of Innocence, ?The Chimney Sweeper?, in Songs of Experience is very dark and pessimistic. This poem also seems to be very judgmental and gives motives for everything, but unlike Song of Innocence, the sweeper in
2. The Chimmney Sweeper
"The Chimney Sweeper" By William Blake Unlike the one in Songs of Innocence, "The Chimney Sweeper", in Songs of Experience is very dark and pessimistic. This poem also seems to be very judgmental and gives motives for everything, but unlike Song of I
3. The Poetry Of William Blake
Many poems written by the same author often have similar themes. The authors usually believe in something very strongly and their poems usually reflect such a nature. Sometimes poets reflect aspects of their personal life in their poems. In the poems "The Lamb" and "The T
4. The Tiger And The Lamb
Many poems written by the same author often have similar themes. The authors usually believe in something very strongly and their poems usually reflect such a nature. Sometimes poets reflect aspects of their personal life in their poems. In the poems "The Lamb" and "The Tig
5. William Blake
To some people is just an ordinary man. To others, Blake is an English poet, painter, and engraver. Blake was born on November 28, 1757, in London, where he spent most of his life. He was the third of five children in his family. Blake\'s family was Nonconformists Prot
6. William Blake
To some people is just an ordinary man. To others, Blake is an English poet, painter, and engraver. Blake was born on November 28, 1757, in London, where he spent most of his life. He was the third of five children in his family. Blake's family was Nonconformists Prote
7. The Little Black Boy
The theme of guardianship, being the act of guarding, protecting, and taking care of another person, is very prominent in William Blake's "". Three distinct instances of guardianship can be seen in Blake's poem. These guardianship roles begin with 
8. Songs Of Innocence And Experience: An Analysis
William Blake wrote Songs of Innocence and Experience, concerned with the differences between how children and adults see and understand the world. Blake had a strong belief that man had potential to attain both wisdom and joy. He truly admired the innocence of children,
9. Blake's "The Fly"
This poem is about life. The question this poem poses is "What is Life?" In order to find the answer, according to Blake, one must consider Nature and Thought. The poem itself is filled with emotion and leaves the reader thinking at the end as to what the poem is about, 
10. Blakes The Chimney Sweeper
William Blake's "The Chimney Sweeper," written in 1789, tells the story of what happened to many young boys during this time period. Often, boys as young as four and five were sold for the soul purpose of cleaning chimneys because of their small size. Thes
11. Dances With Wolves
Tone Techniques: In his novel, "", Michael Blake uses several techniques throughout the story to enhance the tone displayed to the reader. Blake uses tones that vary from sad, (war times) to happy (victorious.) Tone can be defined as the emotion or feeling se
12. London
In , William Blake portrays a very dark and abysmal picture of . Throughout the whole poem, Blake never mentions a positive scene. The poem seems to deal with the lower class part of society, the part which lives in the poor neighborhoods. The first stanza begins with the s
13. London
In , William Blake portrays a very dark and abysmal picture of . Throughout the whole poem, Blake never mentions a positive scene. The poem seems to deal with the lower class part of society, the part which lives in the poor neighborhoods. The first stanza begins with the s
14. Drawing Names In The Lottery
Tone Techniques: Dances With Wolves In his novel, "Dances With Wolves", Michael Blake uses several techniques throughout the story to enhance the tone displayed to the reader. Blake uses tones that vary from sad, (war times) to happy (victorious.) Tone can be 
15. Analysis Of Blake's "London"
In Blake's "London" the speaker connects various characters and socio/political institutions in order to critique the injustices perpetrated in England. The busy, commercial city of London functions as a space in which the speaker can imagine the inescapable interconnectio
16. Comparing "The Chimney Sweeper" And "Songs Of Innocence And Of Experience"
In the poems ?The Chimney Sweeper? from ?Songs of Innocence And of Experience?, the author William Blake reveals the harsh reality of the horrible life that a young boy had to endow as the life of a chimney sweeper. Mr. Blake sets the image in the readers mind by the im
17. Blakes London
In Blake's "London" the speaker connects various characters and socio/political institutions in order to critique the injustices perpetrated in England. The busy, commercial city of London functions as a space in which the speaker can imagine the inescapable interconnectio
18. Never Lose Hope
William Blake, born on November 28, 1757, in London is one of the greatest English poets. His work is studied today all over the world. One of Blake?s poems, ?The Chimney Sweeper?, shows many signs of immortality. In this poem, immortality can only be reached by maintaining
19. The Tyger By William Blake
?A fool sees not the same tree that a wise man sees.? William Blake, The Marriage of Heaven and Hell William Blake, it seems, believes that things can be perceived in different ways. While one person may see a particular image, another may view something in quite another w
20. Blakes London And The Chimney
William Blake was a social critic of his time yet his criticism also reflects society of our own time as well. He mainly communicates humanitarian concerns through his "Songs of Innocence and Experience" which express two opposite states of the human soul, happ