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1: Cinematography: Everything You Need To Know

... used occasionally for comic effect or motion analysis. Cinematography becomes an art when the filmmaker attempts to make moving images that relate directly to human perception, provide visual significance and information, and provoke emotional response. History of Film Technology Several parlor toys of the early 1800s used visual illusions similar to those of the motion picture. These include the thaumatrope (1825); the phenakistiscope (1832); the stroboscope (1832); and the zoetrope (1834 ... allowed the camera to be moved about. In recent years, equipment, lighting, and film have all been improved, but the processes involved remain essentially the same. RICHARD FLOBERG Bibliography Bibliography: Fielding, Raymond, ed., A Technological History of Motion Pictures and Television (1967); Happe, I. Bernard, Basic Motion Picture Technology, 2d ed. (1975); Malkiewicz, J. Kris, and Rogers, Robert E., Cinematography (1973); Wheeler, Leslie J., Principles of Cinematography, 4th ed. (1973). film: -------------------------------- film, history of -------------------------------- The history of film has been dominated by the discovery and testing of the paradoxes inherent in the medium itself. Film uses machines to record images of life; it combines still photographs to ...
2: Sixteen Most Significant Events in US History between 1789 to 1975
Sixteen Most Significant Events in US History between 1789 to 1975 After a review of United States' history from 1789 to 1975, I have identified what I believe are the sixteen most significant events of that time period. The attached sheet identifies the events and places them in brackets by time period. The ... of the events and my opinion as to their relative importance in contrast to each other. Finally, I have concluded that of the sixteen events, the Civil War had the most significant impact on the history of the time period in which it occurred and remains the most significant event in American history. The discussion begins with bracket I covering the period from 1789-1850, and pairs the number one ...
3: American Exceptionalism
American Exceptionalism Perhaps one of the most ambiguous creeds to develop concerning the United States is American exceptionalism, a largely controversial ideology both despised and revered by conflicting historians. Enticed by the presence of a mode of thought so unique to the United States, believers in this singular philosophy, such as Seymour Martin Lipset, a professor of public and political affairs, claims that America is "qualitatively different" in origin, individualism, patriotism, and optimism. History professor Ian Tyrrell disagrees and denounces Lipset's aim to "reaffirm" American exceptionalism. He foresees a time when historians will view the United States only through the "comparative analyses" of other developed countries, creating ...
4: The Zhou Dynasty
... in 256 BC to one of its more powerful warring states, the Ch’in, which later became its own dynasty. The Zhou dynasty was thought to be the shaping period of China, when the recorded history of China began. 3 (See Appendix D1, A2, E1, E4) II The Zhou’s main challenge was the invasion of the nomads from the south. These invasions were of the worst; since the Zhou’s ... the creative peoples, the Zhou would be nothing but a failure. 12 (See Appendix D1, D2, E4) Works Cited 1. Jared Diamond, “Empire of Uniformity”, Discover, March, 1996, p.78; Interview with Professor David Keightley, History Professor, University of California at Berkeley, May 19,1999; Interview with Dr. Alfonz Lengyel, Archaeologist, Sino-American Field School of Archaeology, May 16, 1999; “China,” Encyclopedia Americana, 1998, pp.525 – 527; “The Chou Dynasty,” EBSCO Host, 1999; E-mail from Professor David Keightley, University of California at Berkeley, March 23, 1999. ...
5: Hofstadter
WORKS of philosophy can last for millennia, novels for centuries. Works of history, if they're really good, survive maybe a generation. But Richard Hofstadter's The American Political Tradition: And the Men Who Made It is now celebrating its fiftieth year in print and remains a solid backlist seller. High school students, undergraduates, and graduate students read it, as do lay readers ... book invites us to inquire of it the secrets of its longevity. Discuss this article in Post & Riposte. Begun in 1943, when Hofstadter was just twenty-seven years old, and completed four years later, The American Political Tradition launched the young scholar on his career as the pre-eminent historian of his time. He had already written one book, Social Darwinism in American Thought; it had been his graduate thesis, ...
6: Cinematography Everything You Need To Know
... used occasionally for comic effect or motion analysis. Cinematography becomes an art when the filmmaker attempts to make moving images that relate directly to human perception, provide visual significance and information, and provoke emotional response. History of Film Technology Several parlor toys of the early 1800s used visual illusions similar to those of the motion picture. These include the thaumatrope (1825); the phenakistiscope (1832); the stroboscope (1832); and the zoetrope (1834 ... allowed the camera to be moved about. In recent years, equipment, lighting, and film have all been improved, but the processes involved remain essentially the same. RICHARD FLOBERG Bibliography Bibliography: Fielding, Raymond, ed., A Technological History of Motion Pictures and Television (1967); Happe, I. Bernard, Basic Motion Picture Technology, 2d ed. (1975); Malkiewicz, J. Kris, and Rogers, Robert E., Cinematography (1973); Wheeler, Leslie J., Principles of Cinematography, 4th ed. (1973). film: -------------------------------- film, history of -------------------------------- The history of film has been dominated by the discovery and testing of the paradoxes inherent in the medium itself. Film uses machines to record images of life; it combines still photographs to ...
7: Consensus Historians
Historiography Consensus Historians The consensus view of History emerged in the United States in 1950 until it's eventual dismiss in 1965. Consensus historians emerged in a time period when there were not many consensuses in the United States (Novick pg.333). The ... era knew of the turmoil and felt that they needed to focus their attention on what united America and not what brought the country down. At this time there were three influential writers on consensus history. These three writers were Richard Hofstadter, Daniel Boorstin, and Louis Hartz. Each historical writer had a major influence on the respected subject of consensus history and the involvement they had made consensus history a subject still looked upon today (Sternsher pg.1). From the year 1944 to 1970 Richard Hofstadter enriched the historical world with his writings. In 1948 ...
8: American History 2
American History Examination Essay It is the intent of this paper to prove that the "American Dream" can best be explained as a "ciity upon a hill." "Ciity upon a hill" meaning being above and superior over those below. The Civil War, the imperialistic race of the 19th century, the ...
9: American History vs. American Literature
American History vs. American Literature American Literature looks at and depicts our American Heritage. It goes into depth what many history books could never cover. Whether it's poetry, drama, novel, short story, biography, satire, humor, or folk ...
10: The Rise and Fall of American Communism
The Rise and Fall of American Communism During the twentieth century, the popularity of the American Communist party was fueled less by its beliefs, than by the Government’s ever-more-antagonistic attitude toward foreign influences in America. After the armistice of World War I, disillusioned by the political and social turmoil abroad, the United States sought to unify its people, and to eliminate foreign influences that might prevent the formation of a single American stream of thought. Since the nation was founded on democratic policies and based upon a democratic tradition, the American government sought to diminish the strength of any political philosophy counter-intuitive to democracy, so ...